Crawford Amateur Radio Society
Supporting Amateur Radio in NW PA since 1972

Supporting Amateur Radio in NWPA since 1972

Crawford Amateur Radio Society

News

More on SB#37 with links and sample letter.

Pennsylvania state bill SB37 contains language preventing ARES and other emergency communications volunteers from using their radios in vehicles in any non hands-free mode. The overall bill is fine, only this element is an issue for us. You can help by sending an email to your state senator and representative. Share this email with others and please act quickly.

Use this link to find your state senator and representative and their contact information:

https://www.legis.state.pa.us/cfdocs/legis/home/findyourlegislator/

Below find what I’ve sent to my State Senator and Representative. You are welcome to use this in your communication.

Replace <PROMPT> with your specific information.

Subject: SB37 will adversely affect Pennsylvania Emergency Communications Volunteers
Dear <SENATOR OR REPRESENTATIVE> <NAME>

I am Federal Communications Commission licensed amateur radio operator <YOUR CALL>, an Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) volunteer and a voter in your district.

Mobile radio use is a routine and essential component of my volunteer work which realistically includes much more practice than actual response to emergencies. Amateur radio operators have been and continue to be an important component of emergency response throughout the Commonwealth.

Please delay approval of SB37 and get more input from the volunteer responders in the Emergency Services affected by this:  all other FCC Part 90 radio users, utility companies’ radios, volunteer EMS and firefighters across the Commonwealth, and GMRS Part 95 users will likewise be affected. Few of their and our radios have hands free operating capability.

The National Association for Amateur Radio, the American Radio Relay League and other subject matter experts could help guide the committee to make a better and reasonable law which still protects the public from the distracted driving caused by using gaming devices, cell phones and tablets used for interactive gaming while driving. Those activities should be regulated, not the two-way radios amateurs and other emergency responders all use safely. More precise definitions of the different technologies can solve the ambiguity.

<YOUR NAME>
<YOUR ADDRESS & PHONE>

============================================

Loading

Senate Bill #37 info

his message is directed only to our ARRL Western & Eastern PA section
members to alert you to a serious legal issue returning to the
spotlight.
A new law amending the PA Vehicle Code, pending a vote for
some years, has reappeared recently and passed before the PA House of
Representatives.
A new distracted driving bill presents a serious
problem for operating any radios which require a handheld device,
whether HT or a microphone. The law has exemptions for hands free
devices so cell phones are safe with such common technology as a
Bluetooth earbud mike or the ubiquitous speaker phones in cars today.
Since the bill was amended again in the PA house, it is going back to
the PA Senate for a re-vote in about or week or so. The Senate passed
the original bill some time ago.
I was involved in urging lawmakers to add an exemption for ham radio
and helped add to our reasonable exemption language over 3 years ago.
It survived until just before the latest vote which stripped out our
exemption but left in exemptions for commercial drivers including truck
drivers, bus drivers and public transportation.
Also, emergency vehicle operators may continue to use a radio or phone while driving only if actually being used by an emergency responder and only while in an emergency vehicle.
And before some of you ask as you have, this does not
describe any ham. Any other non-exempt two-way radio user is prohibited
from holding a microphone or HT while driving or even stopped at a light
or stop sign. You must pull over to use your radio. Reporting an actual
emergency with our radios is exempt as is use of a handheld phone while
driving if reporting an emergency.
I do not believe these prohibitions were an intended consequence,
though some believe hams are no better drivers that the public and
should not have an exemption. But all other FCC Part 90 radio users,
utilities radios, volunteer EMS and firefighters, and GMRS Part 95 users
are likewise effected. Few of our radios presently have handsfree
devices for PTT use, though some are emerging. That will require more
years in development however.
While it may take some time to address this, we have very little. For
now, I suggest you write to your PA state senator and copy your PA
representative for your districts. You can find them online.
Suggest they delay the approval and get more input from the volunteer responders in the Emergency Services effected by this and also The National
Association for Amateur Radio, our ARRL. Such subject matter experts can
best help guide the committee to make a better and reasonable law which
still protects the public from the distracted driving caused by using
interactive mobile devices while driving. That is the evil they seek to
regulate. Not the two way radios we all use safely. More precise
definitions of the different technology can solve the ambiguity.
Caution though, do not argue that the law is generally unreasonable or
denigrate the motives of the proponents of the bill. We know they mean
well. We know they generally like hams and emergency responders. Who
among us has not seen distracted driving from texting or looking down at
a cell device while driving? I see it every day.
The issue is really well meaning legislators are not properly defining
the technology they seek to regulate while driving. Also, some in the
past claimed that the law does not apply to ham radio as we are
emergency responders of some sort. That is a stretch – please avoid
such arguments.
Even emergency responders responding to a 911 call in
their personal vehicles (as I do several hundred time a year) are
prohibited from using their public safety radio service HTs or mobile
radios, even if attached to the vehicle, if it requires holding
something to use the device. That cannot really be intended, but many
agree with my professional analysis of the effect of the imprecise
language as passed.
Please search for SB 37 in the PA government website and see the latest
marked-up bill. It will take me some time to get a “clean” version
of the marked-up bill posted somewhere, but I will announce where we can
post it when my office staff cleans up the markups, strike-outs and
underlining so you can see more easily what language is left. What was
changed or stricken out is evident in the official posted markups
online. You will see our long-lasting exemption taken out.
Your emails and/or phone calls to YOUR Representatives and Senators in
PA are effective. A well constructed personal email is likely the best
bet. They get read by staff. Each single response counts. It will give
legislators a pause to think and inquire further. After all, this bill
has been drifting around for some years. A few more weeks delay is
warranted. I have spoken with many about this bill and its effect. If
you have a different opinion or any suggestion, please let me know. Time
is short.
73, and I will see you on the radio. But maybe not while mobile.
Bob Famiglio, K3RF
Director, ARRL Atlantic Division
610-359-7300

Loading

How to get WSJT-X, JTAlert and N1MM Logger+ all working together

How to get WSJT-X, JTAlert and N1MM Logger+ all working together



Compiled by Todd, N3PKJ



Click on a photo to see the image larger.


  This will be a step by step instructional on how to WSJT-X, JTAlert and N1MM Logger+ all working together, not using the Digital Interface within N1MM Logger+. I will assume that at least you have WSJT-X alone working correctly with your radio, having CAT Control plus audio to and from WSJT-X. If you need help with setting up WSJT-X please refer to WSJT-X 2.1 User Guide. So now let’s get started. We start with some important things in WSJT-X.


In WSJT-X.


1. Go to file…..

2. Then to Settings…..

3. Then to the Reporting Tab…..

4. Next in the UDP Server section…..

5. Make sure the 3 checkboxes on the far right are checked. A. Accept UDP requests B. Notify on accepted UDP request C. Accepted UDP request restores window

6. Next in the Secondary UDP Server (deprecated) section…..

7. Make sure Enable logged contact ADIF Broadcast is unchecked. (deprecated) section…..

8. Now let’s look at JTAlert.


9. Go to Settings…..

10. Then to Manage Settings…..

11. Then to Logging……

12. Then to Last QSO API……

13. Then in the UDP Transmission section……

14. Check the box Enable transmission of last QSO…..

15. Then in the UDP port box…..

16. Next go back to the list on the left and go to Applications…..

17. Then to WSJT-X / JTDX…..

18. Now in the Options section……

19. Make sure the Rebroadcast WSJT-X UDP Packets (received only) box is unchecked…..

20. Now let’s look at N1MM Logger+. This part gets a bit tricky, but I will walk you through it. I will assume that you have N1MM Logger+ configured for CAT control to your radio. We have a few maintenance things we need to take care first at this point, make sure N1MM Logger+ is not running. For this part you should familiarize yourself with the Multiple INI Files section in the N1MM Logger+ Docs located at https://n1mmwp.hamdocs.com/setup/software-setup/#multiple-ini-files. You need to navigate to C:\Users\<your username>\Documents\N1MM Logger+\ (Replace “<your username>” with your username for Windows.). Mine happens to be C:\Users\*******\Documents\N1MM Logger+\. You can find this folder in your Documents also.


The N1MM Logger+ Folder…..

21. Locate the “N1MM Logger.ini” file.


The N1MM Logger.ini file…..

22. Then make a copy of it. To do so click on the file to highlight it.


Highlighted N1MM Logger.ini file…..

23. Next press and hold the control key and single left click on the file dragging it anywhere in the Windows Explorer window. You should then have a file called “N1MM Logger – Copy.ini”.


The “N1MM Logger – Copy.ini” file….

24. Next we will rename this file for use with your radio. Single right click on the “N1MM Logger – Copy.ini” file and select rename.


Rename.
….

Next “N1MM Logger – Copy” should be highlighted (Figure 1). Hit the right arrow key and then backspace the word “Copy”, replacing it with “Radio”. (Figure 2). This will be the INI file we’ll use for logging without the use of WSJT-X or any other third party programs, such as MMTTY or Fldigi. (I suggest making separate INIs for each if you use either.)


Figure 1.
…..

Figure 2…..

25. Now we need to make second INI file to be used with WSJT-X.


26. Locate the “N1MM Logger.ini” file again.


The N1MM Logger.ini file…….

27. Then make a copy of it. To do so click on the file to highlight it.


Highlighted N1MM Logger.ini file.

28. Next press and hold the control key and single left click on the file dragging it anywhere in the Windows Explorer window. You should then have a file called “N1MM Logger – Copy.ini”.


The “N1MM Logger – Copy.ini” file.

29. Next we will rename this file for use with WSJT-X. Single right click on the “N1MM Logger – Copy.ini” file and select rename.


Rename……

Next “N1MM Logger – Copy” should be highlighted (Figure 3). Hit the right arrow key and then backspace the word “Copy”, replacing it with “WSJT-X”. (Figure 3). This INI file will be used with WSJT-X.


Figure 3.

Figure 4.

30. Now I will assume that you have a N1MM Logger+ shortcut on your desktop. We will need to make a copy of this too. That will start up N1MM Logger+ using these separate INI files we created. Making a copy of this shortcut is that same process we did for the two INI files we created. Locate this shortcut on your desktop.


N1MM Logger+ shortcut……

31. Single left click on the N1MM Logger+ shortcut to highlight. Next single left click on it then drag underneath the already existing shortcut.


“N1MM Logger+ shortcut Copy”.

32. Now we need to rename this “N1MM Logger+ shortcut Copy” shortcut. Next single right click on this “N1MM Logger+ shortcut Copy” shortcut and then select rename.


Rename.

33. Next “N1MM Logger – Copy” should be highlighted. Hit the right arrow key and then backspace the word “Copy”, replacing it with “WSJT-X”.


Rename.

34. Now let’s rename the original shortcut that will be used with the radio. Using the same process as above but adding “- Radio” to it.


adding “- Radio”.

35. Now we need to point both of these shortcuts to the correct INI files.


36. First locate the shortcut we labeled “N1MM Logger+ – Radio” then right click on it. Select properties.


Select properties.

37. Now in the “N1MM Logger+ – Radio” properties window we need to change the target box to read “C:\Program Files (x86)\N1MM Logger+\N1MMLogger.net.exe” Ini=”C:\Users\*******\Documents\N1MM Logger+\N1MM Logger – Radio.ini” (with the quotation marks as shown). Adding Ini=”C:\Users\*******\Documents\N1MM Logger+\N1MM Logger – Radio.ini” to this line, making sure there is a space after “C:\Program Files (x86)\N1MM Logger+\N1MMLogger.net.exe”. Make sure you put your username for Windows here, replacing *******.


Select properties.

38. Next we need to do the same with the “N1MM Logger+ – WSJT-X” shortcut. In the “N1MM Logger+ – WSJT-X” properties window we need to change the target box to read “C:\Program Files (x86)\N1MM Logger+\N1MMLogger.net.exe” Ini=”C:\Users\*******\Documents\N1MM Logger+\N1MM Logger – WSJT-X.ini” (with the quotation marks as shown). Adding Ini=”C:\Users\*******\Documents\N1MM Logger+\N1MM Logger – WSJT-X.ini” to this line, making sure there is a space after “C:\Program Files (x86)\N1MM Logger+\N1MMLogger.net.exe”. Make sure you put your username for Windows here, replacing *******.


Select properties.

39. Finally we are done with these maintenance operations we needed to get done. So now we will start to configure N1MM Logger+ for use with WSJT-X.


40. Now start N1MM Logger+ use the “N1MM Logger+ – WSJT-X” shortcut we made. Once N1MM Logger+ opens, go to config.


Config.

41. Then select “Configure Port, Mode Control, Winkey, etc…”


Config.

42. Now in the Configurer go to the Hardware tab.


Hardware tab.

43. Make sure Port all reads “None”


Port.

44. Make sure Radio all reads “None”


Radio.

45. Now go to the “Digital Modes” tab and settings should as shown.


Digital Modes tab.

46. Now go to the “WSJT/JTDX Setup” tab. Several things here we need to worry about.


WSJT/JTDX Setup tab.

47. First thing we need to worry about is under “WSJT-X and JTDX UDP Settings”. We need to enable the UDP port.


WSJT-X and JTDX UDP Settings.

48. We need to check the “Enable” box.


Enable box.

49. Next we need to make sure the UDP port number is the same as in JTAlert that we set back at step 15, which is 2333.


UDP port number.

50. DO NOT set the path to WSJT/JTDX. We do not need to do this as for we are not using the Digital Interface in N1MM Logger+.


Path to WSJT/JTDX.

Finally Done!!! Click OK and you should be ready to go!!!!


In the end what will happen when you log a QSO is this WSJT-X will send the information to JTAlert then JTAlert will send the information to N1MM Logger+


DX Watch
Solar Data
Amateur Radio News

We are in the process of responding to a serious incident involving access to our network and headquarters-based systems. Several services, such as Logbook of The World® and the ARRL [...]

ARRL Field Day is June 22-23. Get ready for amateur radio's largest on-air operating event with official 2024 ARRL Field Day merchandise, now available. T-shirts, hats, mugs, pins, patches, and [...]

"ASWFC GEOMAGNETIC DISTURBANCE WARNING ISSUED AT 2302 UTC/09 MAY 2024 BY THE AUSTRALIAN SPACE WEATHER FORECASTING CENTRE."Four halo CMEs first observed over 08-09 May are expected to arriveat Earth on [...]

ARRL has released two new courses to train emergency communications (EmComm) operators for volunteering within the Amateur Radio Emergency Service® (ARES®). Both courses are within the ARRL Learning Center.The Basic [...]

Those attending the 2024 ARRL National Convention at Dayton Hamvention® will have an opportunity to learn more about how amateur radio is relevant and highly involved in the modern emergency [...]

Member-volunteers of ARRL  The National Association for Amateur Radio® in Pennsylvania have successfully protected the legal right to use amateur radio while operating mobile within the state. A handsfree distracted driving [...]

Lt. Col. Richard “Dick” G. Rutan, KB6LQS, has become a Silent Key. He passed away at the age of 85 on May 3, 2024, surrounded by family. Rutan was an [...]

The US Department of Defense (DOD) is hosting this year’s Armed Forces Day (AFD) Crossband Test on Saturday, May 11. For more than 50 years, military and amateur stations have [...]